March 22, 2016 … stopping the runaway

Whatever shortcomings the photo-a-day discipline had, the resulting posts were at least reliable. I now have to rein in that well known thief of time, procrastination.

Chapel

The altar in the Futuna chapel, illuminated by the stained-glass windows

Truth to tell, my photography since my last post has been lacklustre, and I am posting now as my first attempt to regain control. Mary and I have a road trip planned in the near future and I hope that will reignite the fires of creativity.  Anyway, let’s begin. Sunday the 13th, I went to the Futuna chapel in Karori to hear a concert buy a group called WOSOSI (World Song Singers). The Architectural award-winning chapel was a familiar and loved venue for me, since I had participated in a number of spiritual retreats there. The retreat house has long gone, and the chapel itself is de-consecrated,  but it is a registered historic building and the concert was part of a fund-raising endeavour to help in its preservation.

WOSOSI

WOSOSI in song

One of the co-leaders of WOSOSI is a former colleague from my days at the New Zealand Dairy Board, and though I saw her posting about it on Facebook, I went with no real expectations. They were an absolute delight. Their repertoire is global and in this concert we had songs from Norway, various parts of Africa, France, Australia and New Zealand. They are an a capella group, so the voices had to be perfect, and they were.

WOSOSI (2)

Loving what they do

Part of the group’s charm is that they absolutely love what they do and take great joy in singing, whether it’s a psalm, the softest of lullabies or full-throated drinking songs.

Kea

Kea

More recently, I joined members of our camera club on a trip to Staglands Wildlife reserve on the Akatarawa road. Like our choristers above, my fellow club members love what they do which is why it is a pleasure to join them, despite my natural inclination to solitude. We began with a pleasant lunch in the cafe and then followed the ranger to feed the birds in the kea enclosure. The kea is an alpine parrot, and it is rare to be this close to one outside of the mountains.

Terns

White-fronted terns

Today I went out to Plimmerton where I was happy to get close to a very large flock of white-fronted terns on the rocks near the fire station. I find the tern a very attractive bird, clean agile and graceful.

I hope for better things to come.

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About wysiwygpurple

I am a family man, a passionate amateur photographer and a retired academic . What's the purpose of this blog? Well in the first instance it provides me with a platform from which to resume writing, an activity I greatly enjoy. What will the blog be about? Anything that takes my fancy but it is likely to arise from things I see and experience, in my family, in my travels, or anything else I feel like. Each daily post will contain one or more images made the previous day. Sometimes the image will illustrate the points made in the prose, and sometimes the prose will attempt to interpret the image. What kind of images will they be? Always safe for work and family. Usually they will be representational, and sometimes they will be impressionistic or experimental.
This entry was posted in Architecture, Birds, Camera club, Karori, Music, Staglands, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to March 22, 2016 … stopping the runaway

  1. John Titchener says:

    Or, as they say, “One good tern deserves another”.

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