April 12, 2015 … lakes and more lakes

We wandered further afield yesterday.

Third lake

This is apparently known as “Third Lake” … I wonder what happened to all those drowned trees.

From Echuca to Lake Boga is about 140 km. Though the distance is not enormous, the nature of the landscape in Northern Victoria is such that the distance between any two points on the landscape seems immense, and is characterised by long straight roads with enormous paddocks on either side. We got to Kerang and enjoyed a coffee and went a little up  the highway to the first of many lakes. Lake Reedy advertises an excellent bird hide overlooking an ibis rookery. Sadly, it was a triumph of architecture over fitness for purposes, When you reach the upper floor, every opening was covered with steel grills and the chicken wire. The place was totally useless to a bird photographer, and what’s more was infested to plague proportions by bull ants. You could dip these in varnish and sell them as picnic tables.  Another lake nearby was picturesque but eerily empty.

Charm

The eponymous Lake Charm

Heading North we paused for lunch at Lake Charm. There is very little there apart from a holiday camp, and perhaps that is part of its charm. The clouds in a blue sky over a deep blue lake were irresistible, if somewhat clichéd.

PBY

Catalina PBY-5 at Lake Boga museum

At Lake Boga itself, I was delighted to find a very fine museum dedicated to the role of the town and the lake  as a wartime base for repair of flying boats. Everything from the PBY Catalina, the Martin Mariner, the Short Sunderland and even the Dornier Do-24 used by the remnants of the Dutch Air Force in Indonesia, they were all serviced here. A thousand skilled workers restored damaged aircraft and returned them to take their place in the conflict.

Creek

Gunbower Creek at Cohuna

On the way home I stopped at Gunbower Creek in the town of Cohuna to catch some reflections.

Torrumbarry

Near sunset in the wetlands at Torrumbarry

Our last stop of the day was at the Torrumbarry weir, on the Murray River. I’m not sure how anyone else would pronounce that name. but  the local usage seems to be approximately “Trumbree”. However, impressive though the weir and its associated shipping lock are, I was more captivated by the wetland area at the start of the access road.

Back to Melbourne tomorrow.

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About wysiwygpurple

I am a family man, a passionate amateur photographer and a retired academic . What's the purpose of this blog? Well in the first instance it provides me with a platform from which to resume writing, an activity I greatly enjoy. What will the blog be about? Anything that takes my fancy but it is likely to arise from things I see and experience, in my family, in my travels, or anything else I feel like. Each daily post will contain one or more images made the previous day. Sometimes the image will illustrate the points made in the prose, and sometimes the prose will attempt to interpret the image. What kind of images will they be? Always safe for work and family. Usually they will be representational, and sometimes they will be impressionistic or experimental.
This entry was posted in Adventure, Echuca, Lakes, Landscapes. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to April 12, 2015 … lakes and more lakes

  1. nzphotog says:

    Ahh the serenity 🙂

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